Author Archives: Mark

The June 2022 LSAT’s Unusual “Experimental” Section

An unusual event occurred for some LSAT takers during the June LSAT. Specifically, many test takers received a different type of “experimental” section during the fourth section of their exam. To understand what happened, one needs to be aware of two LSAT-related facts: Two Historical LSAT Facts 1. The LSAT currently consists of four sections: […]

An Effective LSAT Prep Strategy: Blind Review

For prelaw students who are taking the LSAT seriously, there are some tried and true LSAT Prep formulas for success that include (1) gaining a very solid understanding of the fundamental logic and legal reasoning skills underlying the LSAT, (2) practicing on an extensive number of real LSAT questions, and (3) practicing with full-length exams […]

“Top 10” Application Factors That Law Schools Consider (Ranked)

While the importance of the first two items on this list (LSAT score and cumulative undergraduate gpa) are not likely to generate much serious debate, the unscientific “ranking” of the remaining law school “soft factors” below might stir up some controversy. After all, not all admission committee members prioritize each of the “soft factors” in […]

LSAT Format Comparison: Current LSAT, Prior LSAT and Prior (Temporary) “LSAT Flex”

The substance and content of the LSAT has barely changed in decades. However, there have been a couple recent format changes that have affected the length and number of sections of the exam. Listed below is a detailed description of (1) the current version of the LSAT (that began in August 2021 and will continue […]

5 Things Law Schools DON’T Care About

So, you probably have learned about the importance of your LSAT score and undergraduate gpa to your law school application. However, I’ve also noticed a series of other factors that many prospective law students believe will influence their application that actually have very little, if any, impact. Here are five of them: A “non-traditional” college […]

Law School Personal Statements: A Key “Soft Factor”

The two most important things law schools evaluate when selecting among applicants (and determining merit-based scholarships) are (1) LSAT scores, and (2) cumulative, undergraduate grade point averages. And, of those two factors, the LSAT tends to be the one that is weighted most heavily. But how do law schools choose among law school applicants whose […]